The Triumvirate of Western Faery

1. A black onyx sphere signifying the Ophelia, Queen of Darkness. 2. A pink and blue speckled eight-sided die. This signifies the Dierne Irene (who later ceded the position to the Dierne Pallis). Queen of Levity. 3. A brass heart-shaped locket, the point of which ends in a key. This signifies the Clarene, King of Personal Sovereignty and Keeper of Gateways.
1. A black onyx sphere signifying the Ophelia, Queen of Darkness.
2. A pink and blue speckled eight-sided die. This signifies the Dierne Irene (who later ceded the position to the Dierne Pallis). Queen of Levity.
3. A brass heart-shaped locket, the point of which ends in a key. This signifies the Clarene, King of Personal Sovereignty and Keeper of Gateways.

“Find a place where love is above all things,” the princess Irene said to princess Claire Clarice Clarene, whose mother condemned their romance. When there appeared no such place in either Old World Faery or our human world, the Clarene created one.

The Clarene crowned emself King of the newly-founded Western Faery, and by eir side ruled the Ophelia—a river fae ey’d rescued while wandering the world as Clarice. When duties of ruling kept them apart, the Clarene sought out the Queen Ophelia and spelled out how life and love is more than duty.

Princess Irene, during that Season, has conspicuously little presence in the current mythfic. With the Clarene, we witness one side of what can happen once you decide to lose the life you knew for the sake of someone you’ve snogged once.

But was Princess Irene waiting for a sign that Claire had completed the quest ey’d given? Did ey have any explaining, arguing, fleeing, fighting, or searching to do over at eir side of the story? How did Irene come by the Clarene’s Faeryland, to warn of the Clarene’s mother on the way to scold a lot? Was this before the Sundering or after?

With not much currently developed of that time, I get the impression that…well, some people who change your life will drop out of it, and that’s okay.

My headcanon of a time before the Sundering is that they may have reigned together—the Clarene, l’Ophelia, and d’Irene (Dierne). There, I find the embarrassing result of holding to structures that don’t help. They were all young, this Triumvirate. They shared a new world to shape, but only knowledge from the Old World of Faery as to how to shape it.

I imagine King Clarene would have taken as a given that eir two great loves would reign alongside em. Princess Irene may have been told too often that ey would grow to be a Queen, to refuse such an obvious development. The Ophelia, a seemingly common river fairy and lowly with pollution, may never have conceived of it.

I like that idea, for the irony of how the Ophelia remains Queen whereas the first Dierne abdicated.

And I imagine the Clarene, with many names and many masks (or roles) to have been more than Irene wished to meet. King Clarene probably doesn’t dote. In a way, the one Irene loved may too rarely be found under a crown, at court.

In my headcanon, that Irene could embody levity without inspiring it could be another factor—that the defining Dierne, in circumspect, still did not accomplish the Work of the Dierne. So, painfully positioned and personally unfulfilled, Irene demoted eirself.

*

This forms, to me, a mythic origin for a number of remaining triads that may feature in present practice.

Devotional rituals as composed of language (spoken, written, or signed prayer), light (candles, or anything that does in a pinch—would do in a pinch), and libation (liquid offering, perhaps kept in a designated altar or shrine like location, or poured out; again, whatever does would do.) This structure may have done for a triumvirate, and just as well now and generally for Four+

The ethereal fetch of Otherfaith metaphysics has three main parts: the tail, the wings, and the crown (or what I call the crest).

I also associate hair braiding with the Ophelia*: three-part French braids to signify the hidden, three-part Dutch braids with the Ophelene for the revealed…and two part but also myriad part fishtail braids with the Laethalia, who’s just odd. I offer this more descriptively than prescriptively: the Ophelia*’s hair looks however else it looks when not braided (or not anthropomorphized), and non-ofelic people certainly wouldn’t be forbidden from hair-braiding. To me, though, braids have come to signify that the Ophelia remembers what even the first Dierne would rather leave forgotten.

Alternatively, these triads could have mythic origins with the Triad, or the Verszou Elves. As it is, of course, with corporeal human Other People perhaps for whom less than three components for a thing feels lacking, and more than three for that same thing feels excessive.

I can also glean something resonant in the idea that Princess Irene arrived at Western Faery long after the Sundering, and for my headcanon Triumvirate to not have been so at all. All the more the Clarene would have changed from Claire as a person, then. The less room in the Clarene’s work life for an old flame, neither would have any call to find that out the difficult way.

*

The Dierne has come to mean, to me, a reconciliation. To explore injuries in a dynamic that would be hard-pressed to consider tolerable in the Clarene’s created world, the first oathbinding I think of (albeit implicit) is shared history.

I couldn’t imagine a newcomer to the West not being unpersoned after invading the Laetha’s nest, as I’ve written Irene doing. The princess has leave to remain in the West primarily because ey was part of the story from the earliest Season. My headcanon of Princess Irene has been less stalwart in other ways. Ey may have known the Unpersoned Fallen Star’s nature, and the dynamic with those who would become the successor Dierne and the first Laetha—yet surrendered that knowledge to their privacy, or to some principle of personal autonomy. My headcanon Irene looks upon the Blazes and wonders how much was eir own fault. The Princess in eir principality among the stars is despotic: Never again the Sundering. This is not an improvement. Irene had learned the wrong lesson from the past. How much more can a person mistake until even the binding of history severs?

It may not be history alone that keeps em in the West, nor mistakes and malice alone that pose a challenge to keeping Irene around. Just by eir narrative position, ey could be perfect: a model ideal, who has done no wrong, the embodiment of a fairy princess’ Happily Ever After. Maybe it’s just me—who can’t imagine or believe in someone as perfect as that—whose musings couldn’t leave Princess Irene (who I identify as Princess Irene) well enough alone.

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